The Mercutio Analysis

Anguish and pain filled me yesterday whilst I was sat on the sofa, my faithful steed sat on its haunches (yes, it has haunches) beside me waiting to jump into action, when I discovered a fairly deep scratch of painful proportions.

Bearing in mind that this wheelchair is still very new (especially for me) and something that I want to really look after, this scratch on the Xenon hit me like a knife to the chest. 

After blaming all and sundry, I look a close look only to see that this deep mark holds all the hallmarks of my cursed enemy – doors. Its height is perfect to match up to a kick plate.  The cut could only have been achieved with metal on metal contact, like the stuff they make in Port Tybalt Talbot.

Having discussed this issue with fellow chair users online, I think I am off to Halfords for a touch up paint kit for a car… because Sunrise don’t do them for the wheelchair.  I can’t help but feel a trick was missed there.  Although I’ll get it out, I’ll always know it was there though.  Battle scars and all.

Living on an inert gas phenomenon

I’ve been living with my new Sunrise Xenon for about a week now, having taken delivery on Tuesday.  It is a complete change from my last chair, a Sunrise Q2, which had a 100 degree footrest angle and weighed in at about 10kg.  By contrast, I’m now weighing in at little under 9kg and with a 92 degree footrest.

xenon-logoI’ll start with some basics about the Xenon.  It’s green – a nice, dark green – with 24 inch rims on the back and soft-roll 4 inch on the front.  The seat is 40cm by 40 cm and on a tilt back, nesting me into the angle adjustable back.  I’ve also got an auto folding foot plate.

There is a definite difference in this chair to other chairs – its very well balanced for such a short chair.

frogleglogoI have got some major differences to the previous chair that make a huge difference though.

The first is the Frog Leg suspension, which, coupled to the 4 inch soft roll wheels, mean that I am not feeling every single lump and bump any more.  I like them a lot and they were worth the investment.

Secondly, I have got a lot of pockets – 3 to be exact but considering most chairs have no way to store anything around them, this is a major plus.  One of the pockets is locked under the cushion which offers a secure storage point for things like my wallet or a Double Decker.

xenon-pocketI am no longer seated on vinyl but instead on a Visco memory foam cushion, which is offering my derriere previously unknown levels of comfort.   Actually, in truth, its nice for my rear end to not be sweltering away and it is complimented by the vented upholstery on the back as well.  On the end of the upholstery are the other two pockets.

xenon-brakeThere are other useful bits too – the fold down handles prevent someone from helping me without first asking if I need or want help.  The wheels have a simple change camber, meaning I can switch from 4 degree to 0 degree with the useful tools, supplied.  The brakes sit neatly beneath the under frame to prevent interfering with a side transfer.

As a chair goes, this one is light enough for me to push myself uphill.  That, for someone with a muscle disease, takes real effort.  It is smooth and will roll with minimal effort.  I’ve already taken it on a few trains with some success – its been welcomed by taxi drivers so far too.  It looks smart, I feel comfortable and I trust it not to do something silly like tip back randomly.

The downside is that I’m afraid to get it mucky or the hand rims scratched.