The history of design thesis

Testing a wheelchair spaceEverything we do becomes history, however significant might be to ourselves or to each other – a legacy, if you will. I’ve had several opportunities in my work to do this in the past through partnerships that we have. One particular partnership is with a rail operator. I received an email in December from a colleague I’ll call Sheila.

The email asked the following:

  • Do I have a passport?
  • Do I fly?

If the answer was yes, then I was to phone my colleague immediately. I did so and after establishing that 29 seconds from clicking send is immediately, I was invited to travel to Switzerland with the company to help with the design input of the new trains for a franchise. I wasn’t to be alone – a colleague with sensory needs had also been invited. The brief was clear – to look at the proposals for people with mobility and sensory needs to identify if they are appropriate. We were invited look for any improvements that can be made to further offer a better experience to customers. Our lived and professional experiences were key to our visit, to assist with the design proposals and offer our constructive thoughts.

A FLIRT train in Konstanz, GermanyThe new trains, which are of a new type to the UK, are made by Stadler and will be in service for the next 20-30 years. The trains (called FLIRT) are commonplace in Europe and now are coming to the UK. The new trains will have 3 different applications – airport, intercity and regional. The airport and intercity stock share one design and the regional trains another.

Arriving at the factory in Bussnang in the morning, we were introduced to the rolling stock types, which will be for the intercity, airport and regional trains. There are two types of wheelchair area, with the intercity and airport trains able to carry three wheelchair users in their chairs and the bi-mode regional trains carrying two wheelchair users. A mock up had been prepared (as the body shells are shortly to enter build phase), which was able to simulate the carriages and their internal layout differences.

There are some crucial differences due to the body alone. The train is “low floor”, which means that in the majority of cases the step may be as low as 100mm. This might also mean a step down. Stadler were able to simulate the different platform heights to identify the challenges of using a ramp from different heights and different degrees of incline. We discussed the elements of ingress and egress – the fact that the body has a sliding step is a new element that brings benefits. The carriage, with a lower floor, has a more pronounced curve in the lower part of the side of the body wall (to accommodate for passing through stations at speed). This means that the buttons at a metre from the floor can be reached by leaning forward.

The train, with its low floor design, is likely to not even require a ramp in some locations. It brings the possibility that completely independent travel could be closer than we realise – no ramp required. The design in place also looks to enable easier communication between on board staff and the customer.

Sat on the toilet lid making notesAt both the mock up and the meeting table, we utilised train plans to identify how wheelchair users may travel and discussed about the need for small tables, capable of holding a coffee. We went through how information may be displayed to the customers and issues conveyed through automated announcements, visual information and manual announcements. Colour contrast, toilet doors and call-for-aid buttons were discussed at length, identifying how small changes can make big differences. We discussed about how wheelchair users may transfer to a toilet (yes, there are two options now – side transfer or facing). What happens if a person falls off the toilet? What about washing your hands? Flushing the toilet? Forgetting to lock the door? Nothing was left out.

With the regional trains, we identified how small and large changes offer a completely different experience to a person travelling. We looked at how the position of priority seats and wheelchair spaces then led to other (non-disability) elements to be considered, giving an improved experience for customers without mobility issues. Suggesting one change meant that wooden panels were produced, measured, marked and used to show that the theory behind suggestions were possible. We discussed tip up seats, traveling with family, traveling alone, the need for people to have choice for their journey (which, to the credit of all involved, had already been considered). The accessible toilet now sits away from the wheelchair user on the opposite side of the vestibule door from the wheelchair spaces, for example. On intercity services, the buffet is within eye sight. 240v and USB power plugs will be available.

All the while, my colleague with a sensory need was giving her own feedback and input, feeding back about how she may undertake a journey, how her guide dog would be involved in her travel needs and how she would identify a priority seat. We looked at the internal colours in use and how these could affect a person with visual requirements. Audio and Visual displays were shown and positions noted to make it easy for a customer to find what they need to know. Automated announcements and visual announcements will help people who have hearing impairments.

I’m covering all this in a short space with no intention of discredit or not mentioning anything. Rail professionals were listening, writing, measuring to achieve the suggestions . I was impressed at the seriousness that they were showing in looking to gather all of the data and identify that they had interpreted our thoughts and ideas correctly. Action lists were drawn up immediately and signed off at the end of the day. At no point did it ever feel like “lip service” either – we are professionals with experience and the teams wanted to learn.

The outcome is that today we wrote history. A train interior was designed with people who are going to use it for the next 20 years. We were given the opportunity to have a positive impact on a project and I truly hope that we delivered. None of this would have been possible if it wasn’t for the partnership that I have through my work with the train service provider and my thanks must go to them for the opportunity. My gratitude cannot be measured.

I look forward to the delivery in the next few years. I’ll be proud to look at the train and know that I’ve had that smallest of hands in a huge and significant project.

The Feng Shui of the Class 321 equilibrium

On Friday 16 December, I was invited to join Greater Anglia aboard a newly refurbished class 321 trainset.  This unit in particular has been internally refreshed to meet the needs of the 21st century customer.  Built in the 1980s using the Mk3 bodyshell, there has been very limited redesign of the internal layout… until now.

My own experience has shown me that a clean vehicle can hide a multitude of sins, so I was keen to have a good crawl all over to identify the pitfalls I could – not to shame, instead to seek rectification and improve the new product further.  I believe in quick wins, too – usually the simplest improvement can be the cheapest and best.

For me, as a wheelchair user, the door I should was obvious from the traditional blue symbols – what awaited me was anything but traditional.  Once on board, I had a choice of turning left into the central saloon, or right to the carriage end and a space beside the lavatory.  Let me emphasis that word again a moment: choice.

Daddydoink in the wheelchair spaceThe space is at the minimum the standard dimensions and is slightly larger in the central saloon.  In both cases there are several tip-up seats available, both also with a fold-away table.  Yes, you read that correctly – a table.  This is invaluable, especially if you get hand shake or need to be able to put your sandwich down a moment.  The table would take a seat out of availability and can only be used if the seat is empty.  Opposite the wheelchair space beside the toilet is a luggage space, big enough for two large cases or eight small, laid flat.  There are seats opposite (proper seats) for friends and family, meaning friends no longer have to give up a tip-up seat for another wheelchair user.  There is a choice between sitting next to the toilet or not.

Toilet door entrance with no lipThe toilet is a standard loo, with both a toilet bowl and a sink.  There is a baby change table and a multitude of signs warning and instructing as to the use of various buttons.  The entrance has no lip (and therefore is a level ingress/egress).  The buttons are clear and the labeling is due to be improved to be clear that unlocking the door opens it, too.  Moving from a train with no loo to this is a huge step forward (or not, as there is no step).

The doors come with audio warnings and buttons at a decent height.  The width of the vestibules has expanded by over 6 inches, giving additional space to both wheelchair users and fellow passengers.  The grab poles that previously restricted access have been moved closer to the vehicle walls and further apart, giving over a meter of space for wheelchairs to get through.

The seats are now higher off the floor and have a good angle between the seat and back for a comfortable journey.  This means it will be easier for an ambulant disabled person to stand from them.  There are grab handles at nearly every seat.

All of this means a journey is very possible.  A journey can be a very emotional thing for a disabled person, too.  By making this easier, with better wheelchair spaces, more priority seats, higher seats – the emotions are positive ones.

This train is not a case of too little, too late.  It’s a case of benchmarking what can be achieved, with the life of this train now extended beyond 2020.  The re-traction project will only extend that life further.

The question is, who’s going to follow suit and copy this brilliant bit of work?  And for Greater Anglia, what is the next good idea?

Photos below – for use please contact me via twitter or a comment.

Refurbished Class 321 – Greater Anglia

Flickr Album Gallery Powered By: Weblizar

The Petroleum Recharging Quandry

I have a bit of an issue and its not one that I can resolve easily on my own without either a bit of trial and serious error (if it goes wrong its a big error) or help.  So, I’ve opted for a bit of help:

Well, actually, that needed a little quick clarification, just in case:

So, this sparked a few conversations, including first cars, comparison of what I’m getting, toys, wheels and so on… but this also showed me several things:

  1. Some people use Service Call
  2. Some people use PinPoint
  3. Some people don’t use anything
  4. One person is waiting for their child to hit 16 so they can learn how to fill the car for them!

So what are Service Call and PinPoint?  They are remote keyfobs that send a signal to a receiver in a petrol station which would, in theory at least, alert a member of staff to assist you refuelling your car.

Service Call Receiver

Service Call Receiver

Service Call I had, I confess, heard of before but forgotten the name of.  It is usually a bright orange box on the window of the petrol station kiosk.  The box tends to sit up high and require line of sight in order to work which, according to the website, has 50m of range.

During my Twitter conversation, I found one user said the following:

Now that is useful in itself, but given the competition…

So, this then makes me ask a question of will I see more use of one more than another.  At this point my mother had already very kindly told me to order a PinPoint device for my birthday present which is upcoming (hint, hint you lot).

So – this seems like a good time to review the PinPoint offering.  This was developed by a company called Contacta and has been endorsed by Disabled Motoring UK, which is a campaign group.  It is not widely installed at the moment but claims to be more reliable than older beacon systems, which I suspect includes Service Call.  A quick check in my local area shows 2 installations, compared to Service Call’s 8 or so.  Neither of them included Tesco though, which is where I am most likely to fill up because of the pay at pump option and club card discounts.

Indeed, PinPoint is widely known:

So – I’ve ordered PinPoint with thanks to my Mother. I’ll probably end up ordering a Service Call too.  Alternatively, I could follow this idea:

Got a bit of a wait though until my eldest reaches 16 though…

 

The Gold Medal Permutation

This week I had the rather huge honour (thanks to ATCO) of speaking along side a prestigious Paralympian.  She has more gold medals to her name than I have chocolate coins (because I have eaten them).  Sophie Christiansen demonstrated time after time how to be in control, confident as she made (in her own words) a “horse dance around”.  In a sandpit, no less.

Sophie Christiansen and Dominic Lund-ConlonAs I sat beside her and listened to how she faces challenge after challenge trying to access her local area and beyond, like anyone else living in the outer west London area, the stories were all too familiar – over travelling to accessible stations, lack of access to public transport, taxis driving straight past.  I wonder just how she manages to maintain control and confidence, as I’m not sure I could.

My own experiences were similar to hers in just travelling to the event in Birmingham.  On the Monday night, when arriving in Kidderminster at 19:45, I found the lift locked out of use and the staff had all gone home.  I had to throw myself on the mercy of a Chiltern train guard to help me up a steep ramp with my suitcase and wheelchair.  (Sophie experiences the same problem on South West Trains, too.)  The reason?  If it breaks down with no staff on the station, I’d be left stranded. Its “un-safe”.

I asked a London Midland Customer Services Manager about this on Tuesday at the “Meet The Manager” event who replied “oo it would take months to sort that”.  He said the solution is to alight me at a station with staff and taxi me to Kidderminster.  “Will the additional time I incur be compensated?” I asked. “No.”  Was the reply. 

Equality for access, but the extra 20-30 minutes in getting to my dinner, the toilet and a shower are not so equal after all.

MAN Bus Headlight ClusterOnce at the show on Tuesday, I tried out the latest in Gas Buses, this one destined for Arriva.  I bumped up on to the platform of the bus, where I went to turn right and move down the gangway, only to find that the drivers cabin protruded in to door platform and gangway; the open door protrudes into the gangway further.  I highlighted the issue, particularly as I am a very narrow chair, to the MAN engineers.  One key designer-engineer said “We pushed a wheelchair through fine no problem” before walking away.  I had to wonder how hard they pushed it through to the otherwise lovely and access compliant bus.

So, when talking about accessibility in public transport on Thursday afternoon, how many of the 12 or so bus manufacturers were there to hear about how their vehicles affect the customers that really rely on them? 2? 5? 9? 

None.  Not one. 

I noted about 4 operators.  Probably 10 or so local authorities.  6 or 8 disabled persons from representative groups.  A few trade organisations and a some media.

As I explained how going on transport for me is a gamble of how accessible it will be, I ponder if bus manufacturers are happy to have their own gamble with the vehicles they sell.

Partnership has been key to a lot of what I have done so far in my public transport career.  So, on behalf of disabled people everywhere, I extend an olive branch to public transport operators and vehicle manufacturers everywhere – come and talk to disabled people (and I don’t mean just a select few that you know of).  Seek out the access groups and individuals.  Learn of who we are and where we are.  Learn what we might need to access your transport services or your solutions you sell.  Let us, disabled people, be able to turn to others and say “look how good it has got”.  Let CPT turn and show others “this is how it should be done.”

Welcome AboardWe all had a lot of momentum over the summer.  It would be a travesty to lose that.

Because each time I manage a trouble free, accessible journey on public transport, I’ll put a chocolate medal around my neck.

The Cylindrical Psychosis

I had to psych myself up.  Take a deep breath. Work out if it was the most economical route or the quickest route or whatever but would it get me there, problem free.

Its not going by foot path nor bus – its tube – an arch-nemesis of the wheelchair user.  I’m going to use 3 different lines, change at two stations – to get to my train home.

Its not an impossible task – but its one that takes a little bit of judgement, a little bit of thought and a chunk of confidence.  And attitude – one of those that says “f*** you to people in your way.

I wasn’t alone either – I had my manager with me, so I had to do this properly or apologise in advance to him for the monster I know I can turn into.

Waterloo to Liverpool Street, peak Friday night rush hour.  Waterloo – Green Park – Kings Cross – Liverpool Street.  Flat access. I knew I could do it – I just had to go for it.

I kicked off on the Jubilee Line westbound for Stanmore.  Two stops up to Green Park on a mildly busy train.  It was warm but bearable.  Step free, totally.  Off at Green Park and up in the lift, my aim next was the Victoria Line.  Wheeling (keeping right) up the uphill stretch in the interchange tunnel to turn left to exit and the lifts – downhill.  This is at first gentle – for 5 metres – then steep for 5, then long and reasonable for another 150 metres.  I did the only thing any lunatic would do – I said excuse me to clear a way and ran humming the brakes down hill, hitting an easy 8MPH as my chair was allowed to succumb to the lure of Law of Gravity.  The Xenon rolls so much more quieter, smoother, neater than the old Quickie Q2 HP, less of a thump as I hit the gap between the tiles on the floor.

Slam the brakes on, turn left, roll through to the lifts – my manager had thankfully kept up.  On to the Victoria Line – the first train crammed and jammed and the second train little better.  But I got the second train – able to get into the wheelchair space and park too, a miracle in itself, as most people are surprised to find a wheelchair user outside of the Jubilee Line, let alone on the tube.

Jump off (not literally – flat access again) at Kings Cross and switch to the Met.  Using the long tunnels, people keep walking 6 abreast and slowly, causing me to get fed up – something I have to live with until a gap opens and I can get moving again, my chair taking little effort to get to speed to enable me to move swiftly to the lift, taking it to the exit and out to go to the Circle, Northern and Met.  Masses of people, most of whom don’t know where they are going.  Through the ticket halls and into the CNM, pushing now to get to the platforms, holding a position and letting others make their mistakes of walking into my path – that pre-meditated aim for the lift which takes me the lines where a Met train for Aldgate is waiting.

I rolled on board.  These trains are new. Flat access. Air conditioning. Success.  I took it to Liverpool Street – success bound for me as I am one train away from being on my train home.  And it all looked so easily done, written down.

But the pre-meditation, planning, thought, mental cajoling to get there was totally invisible.  But it was there.  Took me all of half a second to know I would go for it.  It was a round about way to get from Waterloo to Liverpool Street – but I did it. 

One small roll for me – one giant wheelie for my kind.

I got to Liverpool Street, my journey spend admiring how I could see the length of the train start to finish and rolled off, out and up the short slope to head for the exit gates – my train 10 minutes away and leaving me enough time to get something to eat and book my assistance onwards.

Proof too, that I have a new choice open to me instead of a bus or taxi.  Just like many others.

The Disability Transport Consultancy Quandary

I don’t think its any secret that I work in Public Transport but also have a vested interest as a disabled person and a transport user.  So this post is closer to my work than usual but I must state – this is my opinion.

Since 1985 the Transport Act 1985 stipulated that there would a board dedicated to advising the Department for Transport (or whatever it is called at the time) about the issues being faced by disabled people and the ways to resolve these issues.  This board is known as the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee – DiPTAC.

DiPTAC have been hugely instrumental in making disabled peoples lives more independent.  Public Transport is a gateway industry – it enables people to access other services.  Health, leisure or chore – if you can’t drive or afford a car because all your money gets sucked up by other costs, public transport is essential.  Accessible public transport only came about because of the hard work of the panel and the standards they helped set out.

But following the various spending reviews, its been recommended DiPTAC be abolished.  I believe this to be wrong.  So I’ve been reading the consultation and I’ve got some strong thoughts and fears.

My first fear is that the experience of disabled people is going to be lost.  At the moment, DiPTAC is made up of disabled people and professionals.  However, what changes are made for one disability can negatively affect another.  For example, a lift could mean people who have claustrophobia may be unable to access a building or replacing a receptionist with an intercom could prevent a hearing impaired person from accessing the building unless it had a working loop.  On board buses, a wheelchair space and priority seating could mean that someone might have nowhere to sit with their guide dog.  Its vital that when making changes, every type of disability is considered and consulted with – and not lip service – proper consultation.

My second fear is that because such experience incurs expenses and costs to bring together and discuss, this will be used as an reason not to use face to face consultation or there could be no more than one meeting with a few people who may be based local to the department.  Recently, the Department for Transport were convening a meeting with just a few organisations about what disabled people wanted from public transport in the future.  They did not go to consultation as it was another department’s white paper.  However, this meant that a lot of voices were not heard and there is a strong risk that this could be the case again in the future on much more serious issues.

My third and final fear is that disabled people will not be made aware of legislative changes properly because there is a lack of pressure from within for the department to ensure they are targeting the right people in the right manner for information, views and consultation.  It might be that the department would commit to doing so, but should they fail to properly consult and carry out an Equality Impact Assessment, it is down to the public to take the department to court.  In the mean time, any changes carried out in law could have already had a negative affect on disabled people and at worst, could mean that disabled people are finding themselves unable to access public transport.

So, it is vital that you respond to this consultation.  I will not tell you how to respond – this is up to you.  But I implore you to consider carefully please the needs of not just yourself but those with other disabilities.  Share the word.  Ask your local council transportation department if they have responded.  I will also be responding in a personal capacity and I hope to share my views on here in due course.

The consultation ends in 14 weeks but you should consider your answers now.  If you want to discuss it with others, log on to twitter and use the hashtag #DPTAC.  But most of all – please tell others.

Consultation

The Inter-Departmental Policy Ball Tournament

It has been brought to my notice that the Department for Transport are contributing to the Government’s “Disability Strategy – Fulfilling Potential” with its own disability action plan, to be produced by the Summer of 2012.  The aim is “to address some of the concerns that have been raised on transport for disabled people in documents like RADAR’s guide “Doing Transport Differently” and the Trailblazer’s Transport Report “End of the Line”.

They are organising a small workshop and have invited representatives from groups but concede that there will be no consultation nor will there be any involvement from stakeholders who do not regularly connect with such access groups – disabled people who are usually living their lives as parents, employees and socialites – and might not have the time nor the interest in the ins and outs going on around them – such examples might be a disabled student attending full time college and not in contact with social services or a disabled parent who can get themselves out and about and doesn’t interact with other disabled people or the organisations who represent their disability.

Because of this, the Department for Transport has said that disabled people are welcome to email them what they perceive to be:

  • The gaps that need to be addressed by the public transport industry
  • The priorities and practical solutions for an inclusive transport system

You can email these in bullet points to: elena.barcan@dft.gsi.gov.uk.  When emailing, please outline your disability and how it affects you as well as your method of mobility – wheelchair, cane user, guide dog, companion dog, walking stick, etc…

The idea is to give her the problems that you face in terms of the issue and how it prevents you from travelling – an example:

  • Lack of level access on rail station platforms to train
    • Prevents me from boarding independently
    • Makes me reliant on a member of staff
    • Prevents me from disembarking independently
    • Makes me reliant on someone else advising my destination of my impending arrival

Their deadline for this is around the 1st May. 

Living on an inert gas phenomenon

I’ve been living with my new Sunrise Xenon for about a week now, having taken delivery on Tuesday.  It is a complete change from my last chair, a Sunrise Q2, which had a 100 degree footrest angle and weighed in at about 10kg.  By contrast, I’m now weighing in at little under 9kg and with a 92 degree footrest.

xenon-logoI’ll start with some basics about the Xenon.  It’s green – a nice, dark green – with 24 inch rims on the back and soft-roll 4 inch on the front.  The seat is 40cm by 40 cm and on a tilt back, nesting me into the angle adjustable back.  I’ve also got an auto folding foot plate.

There is a definite difference in this chair to other chairs – its very well balanced for such a short chair.

frogleglogoI have got some major differences to the previous chair that make a huge difference though.

The first is the Frog Leg suspension, which, coupled to the 4 inch soft roll wheels, mean that I am not feeling every single lump and bump any more.  I like them a lot and they were worth the investment.

Secondly, I have got a lot of pockets – 3 to be exact but considering most chairs have no way to store anything around them, this is a major plus.  One of the pockets is locked under the cushion which offers a secure storage point for things like my wallet or a Double Decker.

xenon-pocketI am no longer seated on vinyl but instead on a Visco memory foam cushion, which is offering my derriere previously unknown levels of comfort.   Actually, in truth, its nice for my rear end to not be sweltering away and it is complimented by the vented upholstery on the back as well.  On the end of the upholstery are the other two pockets.

xenon-brakeThere are other useful bits too – the fold down handles prevent someone from helping me without first asking if I need or want help.  The wheels have a simple change camber, meaning I can switch from 4 degree to 0 degree with the useful tools, supplied.  The brakes sit neatly beneath the under frame to prevent interfering with a side transfer.

As a chair goes, this one is light enough for me to push myself uphill.  That, for someone with a muscle disease, takes real effort.  It is smooth and will roll with minimal effort.  I’ve already taken it on a few trains with some success – its been welcomed by taxi drivers so far too.  It looks smart, I feel comfortable and I trust it not to do something silly like tip back randomly.

The downside is that I’m afraid to get it mucky or the hand rims scratched.

Formulation of a new methodology implementation

To say I am a little scared, apprehensive and worried is fair, on this situation. Many times previous in this blog, I’ve compared a new wheelchair to a new pair of legs, this continued choice in mobility being preferred over the options open or should I say singular option open to me – that being electrical propulsion.

EPIOC. Electrically Powered Indoor/Outdoor Chair. Although one wonders how they can be limited to indoors, the outdoor limited chairs so big I couldn’t imagine fitting them in my house. Digressions, procrastinating actually here. Mostly because I’m still having the odd doubt.

Someone said on twitter recently during a #hashtag conversation called #whilstdisabled that independence means sometimes asking for help, which is something I’ve always been reluctant to do. One thing that did bothering me is although this chair will improve my own general mobility, it will mean relearning all my tricks. Tricks like kerb jumping, train dismount, climbing steps. Its like going from freerunning to crawling again. This old dog will be learning old tricks again…

Plus side will be a severe amount of comfort and mobility around tight spaces. I’m looking forward to the FrogLegg Suspension on the front. Fold down handles. Breathing, comfortable fabric. The pros far outweigh the cons.

I suspect its the Old Dog in me, trying to stop change. I have a milestone coming up too which I’m also apprehensive about but I can’t stop that one. So the Old Dog can stay in his basket.

Because change is happening. Tomorrow at 09:30.

The Anticipation of an International Symposium for Wheeled Seating Solutions

I would be telling fibs if I said that by now, I’m getting excited.  If you are a loyal reader, you both will remember that I tried out a number of wheelchairs over the past 6 months and came to an agonising cliff hanger.  This cliff hanger took place in my own chair though, so no one was the wiser…

But, on International Wheelchair Day, a day when Wheelchairs become International Business Wheelchairs and International Spy Wheelchairs and International Rock Star Wheelchairs, I am going to share with you my choice, but only after I’ve waffled a bit. 

I believe that Wheelchairs play more than just the part of being a choice of mobility to replace or supplement where walking is not an option.  My wheelchair has always been a part of who I am. Touch the handle and I feel it.  I sense all going on around my chair. 

My wheelchair has to be my word day suit, my evening rest attire, my play time overalls, my sick time comfort.  It is the item that I am seen in most – it must represent all that I am and show me to be the person I chose to be in the first glance and the final good bye.

I got married in my wheelchair, I carried my first born, my second born and third born, all in my wheelchair.  I have laughed in it, cried in it, sang, danced, drank, eaten, broken wind (!) and most of all I have listened in it.  My wheelchair is always there with me.  The current chair has been more so – for this paragraph at least – it has been the only chair MBW, Monkey, Nuzzle and Scratch have ever known.

My chair can go fast, it can go slow, it can corner, it goes straight.  It’s quiet on a smooth surface, it’s noisy on the bumps. 

And for all the amount I wish I were walking today, I know that my choice of mobility now will be my noble stead – and I like the chair I have.

So when you see me next, if you know me, its ok to tell me that my chair looks nice, or it needs a clean.  It’s ok to tell me that my light up wheels make you smile or that having the word “Quickie” on the back is inappropriate in a professional workplace. 

But not everyone has a suitable wheelchair.  They are expensive.  Each is custom made to the user and children especially go through them quickly as they grow.  So, on International Wheelchair Day, this is what I ask of you.  Please go to Whizz-Kidz Donation page and give them a little something if you can. 

And I’ll thank you for it – from my new Xenon, if I can.